Runner’s Feet


 

More Foot Problems
Blisters
Blisters are one of the more common foot injuries in runners, they often occur at the back of the heel, the side of the big toe or anywhere friction occurs. The best treatment is prevention, make sure your socks and shoes fit correctly. At the first feel of something rubbing, stop running and adjust your shoes or socks, use bandaids or pads (corn pads can be good) if you think a certain area of your foot is prone to blisters. 

You can drain large blisters with a sterilized needle however, do not remove the layer of skin as it acts as a protection for the new sensitive layer of skin underneath. Keep the area dry, do not apply creams on the area. Pharmacies sell good pads, like blister stop, that can stay over the blister for days, it tends to drop off by itself when the blister is heeled. Any infection in the blister should be treated by a doctor.

Stress Fractures
The long bones of the toes are called metatarsals and can suffer from stress fractures, simply from running. A stress fracture is an incomplete break in a bone and can be very painful and come on suddenly, without any specific injury or trauma. Common signs of stress fractures of the toes are swelling and bruising of the top of the foot when no injury has occurred. A podiatrist is a good person to see for this condition and can reccommend treatment, often it's rest and can take 6 weeks or more to heel.

Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)

The Plantar Fascia is a ligament in the bottom of the foot and when inflammed can cause severe pain in the heel, especially when the heel first touches the ground in the morning or after a period of rest. For runners often the pain is there at the start of their run, and then seems to disappear only to return again afterwards. The pain is often caused by inflammation brought on by running, so icing (10 minutes on 10 minutes off) and anti inflammatory creams and medications are good treatments. Another reason for Plantar Fasciitis could be the bio mechanic of your gait and you may need to be fitted with orthotics, once again the Podiatrist can help with this.

More On Blisters
I know a lot of you suffer from blisters, and sore feet from your running, and when you increase your distances these problems become more prevalent and harder to get rid of. So I've included a few tips from myself and some ideas some other Lazy runners have come up with that have worked for them recently. Blisters are one of the more common foot injuries in runners, they often occur at the back of the heel, the side of the big toe or anywhere friction occurs. The best treatment is prevention, make sure your socks and shoes fit correctly. At the first feel of something rubbing, stop running and adjust your shoes or socks, use bandaids or pads (corn pads can be good) if you think a certain area of your foot is prone to blisters. 
You can drain large blisters with a sterilized needle however, do not remove the layer of skin as it acts as a protection for the new sensitive layer of skin underneath. Keep the area dry, do not apply creams on the area. Pharmacies sell good pads, like blister stop, that can stay over the blister for days, it tends to drop off by itself when the blister is heeled. Any infection in the blister should be treated by a doctor.

Shoes can be the major cause of foot blisters, make sure when you buy new shoes that they are fitted correctly, go for a little jog around the shop if anything feels too tight or too loose or is rubbing, don't think they will be right and that you will wear them in, mention it to the salesperson. Get yourself a good comfortable pair of running socks and always wear the same socks with your shoes, any change in socks can bring on blisters. If your feet get hot and sweaty and burn when running, tell the shoe salesperson so they will fit you with mesh, breathable fabric, many shoes are now designed to cool the feet down when you are running.

We are coming into warmer weather and in Queensland that means humidity, it's a combination of the moisture and friction that cause chaffing and blisters, so feet tend to suffer more in Summer. Try to keep your feet cool and dry, a dusting of talcum powder or anti chaff powder on your feet before you put your socks on can help. Take your shoes and socks off as soon as you finish your run, throw the socks in the wash and place your shoes out in the sun to air out and dry the insides. Shower and make sure you wash and dry your feet, constantly check your feet for any signs of redness or cracks as early detection and treatment is the best way to go.

Marie from Mooloolaba uses Paw Paw cream for chaffing (it's the one I recommend), she felt she may of had blisters coming on before the Noosa Half, so she warmed some in her hands and slathered it over her feet and between her toes, she said it really helped and her feet were good during and after the run.

Krissi from Noosa, had a little blister that looked threatening the day before the Noosa Half, she applied second skin ( a thin, transparent adhesive) to cover the blister and then wore my anti blister socks and said her feet were great on the day.


Second Skin is great and can be bought at the pharmacy, just apply it to any redness or blister and leave it on for days, you can shower with it on. Usually when it finally falls off the redness or blister is healed, use it on trouble spots all the time as a preventative if you like.

Lazy Runners who have purchased my anti blister socks tell me that they are great and comfortable and really help with sore feet and blister prevention.

 


 

 
     
 
 

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